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Survey shows we share too much information online

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tmithumbA study of mobile etiquette by Intel has found the majority of Australian adults and teens are sharing too much information about themselves online.

According to the report – Global State of Mobile Etiquette and Digital Sharing – 92 per cent of adults and 84 per cent of teens think it’s a case of TMI (too much information) online.

More than half of the Australians surveyed (56 per cent) were annoyed with people who share every detail of their lives on social networking sites.

More than a quarter of Australian teens (26 per cent) admitted they’d checked up on ex-boyfriends and ex-girlfriends online.

These figures are actually the highest recorded across the worldwide survey conducted by Ipsos Observer which was commissioned by the Intel Corporation.

The survey was conducted among adults and teens in eight countries – Australia, Brazil, China, France, India, Indonesia, Japan and the United States.

Survey highlights by country include: 



Australia

* Ninety-two per cent of adults and 84 per cent of teens in Australia believe that people divulge too much information about themselves online. This is the highest across surveyed countries.

* Over half of adults in Australia (56 per cent) report that one of their top online sharing pet peeves is people who post about every detail of their life.

* Eighty-five per cent of teens in Australia who share recognise the lasting impact of sharing personal information online.

* Over a quarter of teens in Australia (26 per cent) report they have kept up with the lives of ex-girlfriends or ex-boyfriends with information they find online.

Brazil

* One-fifth of teens in Brazil (22 per cent) report that they share online constantly throughout the day.

* Four out of 10 adults in Brazil (43 per cent) share sports-related information online via their mobile Internet-enabled devices.

* Sixty-five per cent of adults in Brazil said one of the top reasons they share information online is to express opinions or make statements, and over half (54 per cent) share information online to make new friends. 

* The vast majority of adults, especially those in Brazil (86 per cent), believe that people exhibit poor online sharing manners.

* Adults in Brazil are more likely than others surveyed around the world to consume music online via their mobile Internet-enabled devices (70 per cent).

* Eighty per cent of teens in Brazil constantly check to see what their friends are sharing online.

China

* Seventy-seven per cent of adults in China report to being an “open book,” saying there is very little they would not share online.

* Half of adults in China (51 per cent) admit that at times they find themselves sharing too much personal information online.

* Eight out of 10 adults in China (82 per cent) share or post online once a week or more, with nearly one-third (31 per cent) reporting they share throughout the day.

* Sixty-five per cent of adults in China report being more comfortable sharing information online than in person, and 62 per cent of adults in China report the top reason they share information online is to express opinions or make statements.

* Sixty per cent of adults in China feel like they are missing out when they are not able to share or consume information online.

* Adults in China (68 per cent) are more likely than others surveyed around the world to believe mobile manners have truly improved compared to a year ago.

France

* Eight out of 10 teens in France share online at least once a week, while only 47 per cent of adults in France report that they share as frequently.

* Four out of 10 teens in France (41 per cent) are more comfortable sharing online than in public settings.

* Seventy-two per cent of adults in France say they typically choose not to associate with people whose opinions they disagree with online.

* Eight out of 10 adults in France believe that when it comes to sharing online, people exhibit poor sharing manners.

* Consistent with the other countries surveyed, 95 per cent of adults in France wish people practiced better mobile etiquette when using their mobile devices in public.

India

* Eight out of 10 adults in India (81 per cent) share information online once a week or more, with nearly half (48 per cent) reporting that they share once a day or more.

* Sixty-four per cent of adults in India report being more comfortable sharing information online than in person.

* More than 4 out of 10 adults in India (44 per cent) have been embarrassed by or regretted something they have shared online.

* Nearly 7 out of 10 teens in India (69 per cent) feel like they are missing out if they are not able to share or consume information online.

* Four out of 10 teens in India (43 per cent) try to make sure every moment of their life is captured online (even the ordinary moments).

* Over half of teens in India who share report communicating with their family (56 per cent) and friends (67 per cent) more online than in person.


Indonesia

* Nine out of 10 adults (91 per cent) and nearly 8 out of 10 teens (79 per cent) in Indonesia report they always feel connected with their family and friends because they share online.

* Nearly half of adults in Indonesia (46 per cent) report that they share online to say what they cannot share openly in other settings (e.g. at work, with friends, etc.).

* More than any other country surveyed, nearly 9 out of 10 of adults in Indonesia (87 per cent) report one of their top online sharing pet peeves is people who use profanity.

* Fifty-two per cent of adults in Indonesia feel like they are missing out if they are not able to share or consume information online.* •Sixty-eight per cent of adults in Indonesia share information online about an event in the moment while they are still there.

* Almost half of teens in Indonesia (49 per cent) admit that at times they share too much personal information online.

Japan

* Over one-third of adults in Japan (37 per cent) report that they always feel connected to family and friends regardless of where they are because they are able to connect online.

* Nearly one-third of adults in Japan (29 per cent) report that they have shared false information online.

* Over half of adults in Japan who share (55 per cent) report they have a different personality online than in person.

* Nearly four out of 10 adults in Japan share product and service reviews (38 per cent) or recommendations (39 per cent) online via mobile Internet-enabled devices.

United States

* Nine out of 10 U.S. adults report that they believe people are sharing too much information about themselves online.

* An overwhelming majority of U.S. adults (85 per cent) share information online, with one-quarter sharing once or more a day (26 per cent).

* The top online sharing pet peeve for nearly six out of 10 U.S. adults (59 per cent) is people who constantly complain.

* One out of five U.S. adults (19 per cent) admits to sharing false information online.

* Forty-two per cent of U.S. teens feel like they are missing out if they are not able to share or consume information online.

* Four out of 10 U.S. teens (42 per cent) are more comfortable sharing information online than in public settings.

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